The Dermatology Nurses' Association
Nurses serving nurses for more than 30 years!

Press Releases

2005

Please note that due to a change in management companies, the contact information found in all press releases prior to January 1, 2008 is no longer applicable.

Dermatology Nurses to Discover Latest in Patient Care and Professional Practice at Annual Convention Released: December 27, 2005
The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) will hold its 24th Annual Convention March 2-5, 2006, at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. This year's convention reflects the core elements of DNA's Strategic Plan: inclusion, expertise, competency, research and advocacy. Education sessions will cover a number of topics affecting the current practice of dermatology nursing, from basic to advanced levels.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs: Nurses and Parents Should Work Together to Protect Children From Excessive Sun Exposure Released: December 22, 2005
With proper guidance and support from nurses, parents can reduce their children's risk for skin cancer by implementing sun safety techniques to protect them from the sun's harmful rays. In the December 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Maryellen Maguire-Eisen, MSN, RN, OCN, executive director, Sun Protection Foundation, and co-authors describe what nurses can do to educate parents on sun protection techniques.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs: Topical Cream and Wet Wrap Offer Hope For Atopic Dermatitis Sufferers Released: October 18, 2005
The combination of a topical corticosteroid and a wet pajama wrap significantly improves the itching and discomfort associated with atopic dermatitis (AD), according to an article in the October 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nurses' Association Helps Keep Families Safe from Skin Cancer During National Campaign Released: September 15, 2005
The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) has joined forces with the Women's Dermatologic Society (WDS) in a sweeping national education campaign to reduce skin cancer in America.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs: Leadership, Professional Development Key in Providing Quality Patient Care Released: August 18, 2005
Leaders in the health care industry are focused on providing patients with safe and quality care. A 2001 Institute of Medicine report illustrated the need for redesigning faulty health care systems to provide better care and suggested improving systems by developing high performing patient centered teams. In the new column Management Focus, debuting in the August 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Pamela Matheny discusses what health care leaders can do to keep high-performing employees within the organization.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nurses' Association Distributes Nurse Competence in Aging Awards Released: May 12, 2005
The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) presented the Nurse Competence in Aging Award to Sue McCann, MSN, RN, DNC, and Jeanne McElhose, RN, at its 23rd Annual Convention in New Orleans, February 17-20, 2005. The award recognizes an active DNA member whose professional practice and achievements best exemplify the collaborative goals and objectives of DNA and the Nurse Competence in Aging Initiative, and who is committed to nursing care for older adults.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nurses' Association Supports Urgent Call by World Health Organization to Restrict Use of Tanning Beds Released: April 1, 2005
The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) announced today its strong support of the recent World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendation to ban sun bed use worldwide for those under age 18.
Read the Full Release

Cathy Boeck Assumes Presidency of Dermatology Nurses' Association Released: March 30, 2005
Cathy Boeck, RN, CCRC, DNC, assistant director of clinical research in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, assumed the role of president of the Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) for 2005-06 during DNA's 23rd Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA, February 17-20, 2005.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nurses' Association Shows What They Know Matters with Record-Breaking Attendance at Annual Convention Released: March 17, 2005
The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) drew over 1,000 nurses to its 23rd Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA, February 17-20, marking the highest convention attendance in its history. Armed with the theme Because What We Know Matters, attendees enjoyed an exhibit hall filled with 107 booths, as well as a wide variety of special events, networking opportunities, and top-quality educational sessions.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nursing Journal Presents Writer's Awards at DNA Convention Released: March 11, 2005
Dermatology Nursing journal continued its tradition of recognizing nurse authors for outstanding contributions to the journal during the Dermatology Nurses Association (DNA) 23rd Annual Convention, February 17-20, 2005, in New Orleans.
Read the Full Release



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 27, 2005
Contact: Linda Alexander
856-256-2300, ext. 2411;
Linda@ajj.com

Dermatology Nurses to Discover Latest in Patient Care and Professional Practice at Annual Convention

Dermatology Nurses’ Association 24th Annual Convention
Promoting Excellence in Dermatologic Care
March 2-5, 2006 • San Francisco, CA
www.dnanurse.org

Pitman, NJ – The Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) will hold its 24th Annual Convention March 2-5, 2006, at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.

This year’s convention reflects the core elements of DNA’s Strategic Plan: inclusion, expertise, competency, research and advocacy. Education sessions will cover a number of topics affecting the current practice of dermatology nursing, from basic to advanced levels. Program planners extended concurrent session times this year to encourage greater subject depth and additional audience participation.

In addition to education sessions, participants will network with colleagues, attend special events, earn continuing education credits and learn about the latest products and technologies in the exhibit hall. The complete registration brochure is available on DNA’s Web site, www.dnanurse.org.

Program
On Thursday, March 2, seven pre-convention education activities will be offered including the Nurse Practitioner Forum, a speaker panel designed for the advanced practitioner. Academic leaders and experts will convene to discuss immunology and will discuss basic physiology and application, dermatoses and pharmaceutical marketing data. The Forum will continue on Friday, March 3, with two new skills sessions on cosmetics and dermoscopy.

Other pre-convention workshops will cover dermatologic nursing basics, dermatologic surgery, phototherapy, wound care and cosmetic dermatology. A dermatology nursing certification review course will also be offered for the first time this year.

On Friday, March 3, keynote speaker LeAnn Thieman, LPN, CSP, will open the conference by uplifting and honoring nurses in her address, “Chicken Soup for the Nurse’s Soul.” Thieman will share stories from the Chicken Soup book and from her 35-year nursing career to inspire her colleagues and remind them to care for themselves as they care for others.

Concurrent sessions will run from Friday, March 3, through Sunday, March 5. Topics include:

New treatments for wound healing
Benefits and risks of phototherapy
Basic and advanced “What’s Your Assessment?” sessions
Use and effects of cosmetic skin care products
Common genetic skin disorders
Rare skin tumors
Lasers in dermatologic settings

Special Events
DNA will hold its opening reception on Thursday, March 2. Attendees will celebrate dermatology nursing and enjoy music, light hors d’oeuvres and beverages at this annual event. The reception is sponsored by Cetaphil-Galderma Laboratories, L.P.

In addition to education sessions, there will be several corporate-sponsored breakfast, lunch and dinner symposia. Topics include treatment for atopic dermatitis, administering and managing biologics, anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor) therapies for treating psoriasis, connections between dermatology and rheumatology, daily skin care and dealing with psychological issues in acne patients.

Certification Exam
The Dermatology Nurse Certification Exam will be offered on Saturday, March 4. Pre-registration is required for the exam. For more information, visit DNA’s Web site, www.dnanurse.org/certification, or contact C-NET at 800-463-0786.

Continuing Education
The three-day convention will provide a minimum of 15.2 contact hours. Additional contact hours will be given for the pre-convention education activities, special education workshops, and sponsored symposia.

Registration
Complete conference registration information and on-line registration are available on DNA’s Web site, www.dnanurse.org. For additional information, contact DNA’s National Office, East Holly Avenue Box 56, Pitman, NJ 08071-0056; phone: 800-454-4DNA or 856-256-2330; fax: 856-589-7463; e-mail: dna@ajj.com.

# # #

The Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNA’s core purpose is to promote excellence in dermatologic care.

Back to Top



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 22, 2005
Contact: Linda Alexander
856-256-2300, ext. 2411;
Linda@ajj.com 

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs
The Official Journal of the Dermatology Nurses’ Association

 

Nurses and Parents Should Work Together to Protect Children From Excessive Sun Exposure
With proper guidance and support from nurses, parents can reduce their children’s risk for skin cancer by implementing sun safety techniques to protect them from the sun’s harmful rays. In the December 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Maryellen Maguire-Eisen, MSN, RN, OCN, executive director, Sun Protection Foundation, and co-authors describe what nurses can do to educate parents on sun protection techniques.

Skin cancer is associated with both intense sporadic sun exposure and chronic exposure, according to the authors. They recommend nurses educate parents on the dangers of overexposure to intense ultraviolet (UV) rays and the benefits of using portable shade when outside, including parasols, beach umbrellas and sun tents; wearing sun-protective clothing, such as hats, T-shirts and sunglasses; and using sunblock. Protecting children from excessive sun exposure without impeding recreational activities should be nurses’ goal.

Maguire-Eisen and co-authors also suggest school nurses help protect children from overexposure to UV rays at school and recommend implementing a sun safety curriculum. The authors offer a list of sun protection resources, many of which are available for free and can be easily modified to fit any school’s needs. For more information about the Sun Protection Foundation, visit www.sunprotectionfoundation.org. (The ABCs of Sun Protection for Children; Maryellen Maguire-Eisen, MSN, RN, OCN; Karen Rothman, MD; Marie France Demierre, MD, FRCPC; Dermatology Nursing; December 2005; www.dermatologynursing.net)

Deep Chemical Peel Is Excellent Tool for Facial Skin Rejuvenation
Such skin abnormalities as dyschromia, fine or course wrinkles, acne scars and premalignant skin tumors can be successfully treated with a deep chemical peel, often more effectively than with other medical or surgical methods. In the December 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Marina Landau, MD, recommends deep chemical peel to rejuvenate facial skin and describes the techniques used during the peel and potential complications.

The nonsurgical procedure is relatively pain-free due to IV sedation, says Landau. The procedure includes applying the peeling solution, leaving a waterproof zinc oxide tape mask on the face for 24 hours and covering the face with a regenerative mask (bismuth subgallate powder) which stays on for seven days. Landau recommends patients take pain killers for the first two days.

Complications do exist with deep chemical peel, the most serious of which is cardiac arrhythmia. Landau advises physicians perform full cardiopulmonary monitoring during deep chemical peel. Other complications include scarring, changes in pigmentation, infection and skin atrophy. According to Landau, aside from these potential complications, deep chemical peel is a safe and cost-effective treatment that provides high patient satisfaction. (Advances in Deep Chemical Peels; Marina Landau, MD; Dermatology Nursing; December 2005; www.dermatologynursing.net)

Living With Pityriasus Rubra Pilaris
A new feature in Dermatology Nursing in 2005 is the series “Patients’ Perspectives: Living With...," a column designed to help dermatology nurses better understand the physical and emotional challenges faced by patients with chronic dermatologic diseases or conditions. In the column, patients answer specific questions about diagnosis, treatment, education, support and life changes. In this column, a patient describes her life-changing experiences after being diagnosed with pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP).

In a corresponding article, David Jerard Pincus, MD, describes the five clinical presentations of PRP and recommends physicians become knowledgeable about the different presentations in order to treat the condition appropriately.

PRP is a rare skin condition with symptoms that include reddish-brown discoloration, scaling, and severe skin flaking. Pincus says patients may initially present with redness and scaling of the face and scalp as well as lesions in hair follicles. PRP can be inherited or acquired and affects all ages and races. The cause of PRP is unknown, and a cure is also unknown.

According to Pincus, patients experience a variety of clinical progressions but treatments are available for all types. He notes the majority of PRP patients have a favorable prognosis. (Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris: A Clinical Review; David Jerard Pincus, MD; Dermatology Nursing; December 2005; www.dermatologynursing.net)

# # #

Members of the media: Feel free to use these news briefs as filler in your publications. For more information, or if you would like to interview one of the authors, contact Linda Alexander at linda@ajj.com or 856-256-2300, ext. 2411.

Dermatology Nursing is the official journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA). The journal is nursing's premier skin care resource and contains state-of-the-art, peer-reviewed articles on all aspects of skin and wound care.

Back to Top



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 18, 2005
Contact: Linda Alexander
(856) 256-2300 ext. 2411, linda@ajj.com

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs
The Official Journal of the Dermatology Nurses’ Association

Topical Cream and Wet Wrap Offer Hope For Atopic Dermatitis Sufferers
The combination of a topical corticosteroid and a wet pajama wrap significantly improves the itching and discomfort associated with atopic dermatitis (AD), according to an article in the October 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing. Kelly L. Barham, MD, and Gil Yosipovitch, MD, suggest patients use the topical cream and wet pajama treatment for one week to enhance the medication’s effectiveness in the affected area and alleviate itching.

Wet-wraps work by cooling the skin, increasing moisture to the skin and creating a barrier against scratching. The authors propose using a pair of pajamas as the wet-wrap garment in this outpatient treatment for adults and children.

Barham and Yosipovitch describe steps for applying daily wet-wrap treatments at home and suggest doing the treatment once a day for a week. The authors consider nurses invaluable in educating patients about AD and believe their counseling will improve the effectiveness of wet-wrap treatments. (It’s a Wrap: The Use of Wet Pajamas in Wet-Wrap Dressings for Atopic Dermatitis; Kelly L. Barham, MD; Gil Yosipovitch, MD; Dermatology Nursing; October 2005; www.dermatologynursing.net)

Cryomolds Faster, More Accurate Than Free-Hand Embedding
The use of cryomolds in tissue embedding and preparation during micrographic skin cancer surgery reduces time spent embedding and allows for more complete tissue sections, according to an article in the October 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing. Kenneth Bielinski, MD, states that the cryomold technique is not widely used, and he describes how to incorporate the technique into dermatologic surgical practice.

Bielinski finds that using a cryomold, a small, disposable plastic mold designed to hold specimens, allows him to complete specimen embedding (checking for cancerous cells) more quickly than the free-hand technique. In addition, the cryomold’s flat base provides a level plane to work on, and the number of sections (layers of skin) required for margins is reduced, says Bielinski.

The author found the cryomold worked best with thin specimens because thick or very large specimens did not fit in the cryomold. Bielinski says changing from free-hand embedding to the crymold greatly contributed to a more accurate and efficient laboratory. (Cryomold Use in Mohs’ Micrographic Surgery; Kenneth Bielinski, MD; Dermatology Nursing; October 2005; www.dermatologynursing.net)

How to Operate a Well-Run Drug and Vaccine Management System
Since many drugs and vaccines now require refrigeration or freezing, dermatology practices should maintain a well-designed drug and vaccine management system, according to the Management Focus article in the October 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing. Gabi Brockelsby recommends designating one person to manage the program and another as a backup. These individuals will be responsible for storing and dispensing all drugs and vaccines in the practice.

Brockelsby proposes developing a drug and vaccine inventory log, implementing a training program for all employees, maintaining appropriate storage equipment and preparing for emergencies. She provides guidelines for implementing these processes and recommends dermatology practices with drug and vaccine management systems in place review their processes to ensure compliance.

The Management Focus series, written by members of the Association of Dermatology Administration/Managers (ADA/M), explores issues health care managers face related to patient care as well as nonclinical topics and emphasizes the benefit of collaboration in providing patient care. For more information about ADA/M, visit www.ada-m.org. (Vaccine and Drug Storage; Gabi Brockelsby; Dermatology Nursing; October 2005; www.dermatologynursing.net)

# # #

Members of the media: Feel free to use these news briefs as filler in your publications. For more information, or if you would like to interview one of the authors, contact Linda Alexander at linda@ajj.com or 856-256-2300, ext. 2411.

Dermatology Nursing is the official journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA). The journal is nursing's premier skin care resource and contains state-of-the-art, peer-reviewed articles on all aspects of skin and wound care.

Back to Top

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 15, 2005
Contact: Janet D’Alesandro
856-256-2422; janetd@ajj.com

Dermatology Nurses' Association Helps Keep Families Safe from Skin Cancer During National Campaign

PITMAN, NJ – The Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) has joined forces with the Women’s Dermatologic Society (WDS) in a sweeping national education campaign to reduce skin cancer in America.

Along with other organizations, dermatologists, community leaders and volunteers, DNA is participating in events across the country as part of the WDS “Families Play Safe in the Sun” campaign. The program, which is supported by a $1 million grant from 3M Foundation, includes free screenings, education materials, complimentary products, youth-oriented contests and community programs. Events will take place over three years in 15 cities across the U.S.

“One of a dermatology nurse’s top priorities is to educate patients, so we are very excited about participating in this campaign,” said DNA President, Cathy Boeck, RN, CCRC, DNC. “Based on people’s reactions at the events, the campaign is proving amazingly effective. Volunteers are reaching people right in their own communities, discussing how to prevent and detect skin cancer, and demonstrating the correct way to use sunscreen and other protection methods.”

Thousands of families attended the campaign’s most recent events in Minnesota, August 3-5, 2005, at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and at the Senior PGA 3M Championship in Blaine. Boeck and Cynthia Hanson, RN, who are members of DNA’s Minnesota Chapter, helped physicians and dermatology residents screen patients and educate families about the sun’s dangers.

Teaching the public about skin cancer and supporting quality nursing care are among DNA’s pre-eminent goals, Boeck said. The organization advocates for such legislation as restricting tanning bed use among minors and also disseminates position statements to educate health care workers and the public about detecting and preventing skin cancer (www.dnanurse.org).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the skin cancer rate in the U.S. has doubled since the 1970s, with an estimated 1.1 million cases diagnosed annually. The WHO also reports that half of all cancer cases in America today are skin-related.

For more information about the “Families Play Safe in the Sun” campaign, visit www.playsafeinthesun.org, or the WDS Web site, www.womensderm.org. For more information about DNA, visit www.dnanurse.org.

# # #

Members of the media: If you would like to interview DNA President Cathy Boeck or obtain photos of WDS campaign events, contact Janet D’Alesandro at 856-256-2422; janetd@ajj.com.

The Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNA’s core purpose is to promote excellence in dermatologic care.

Back to Top



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 18, 2005
Contact: Linda Alexander
856-256-2300, ext. 2411; linda@ajj.com

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs
The Official Journal of the Dermatology Nurses’ Association

Leadership, Professional Development Key in Providing Quality Patient Care
Leaders in the health care industry are focused on providing patients with safe and quality care. A 2001 Institute of Medicine report illustrated the need for redesigning faulty health care systems to provide better care and suggested improving systems by “developing high performing patient centered teams.” In the new column “Management Focus,” debuting in the August 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Pamela Matheny discusses what health care leaders can do to keep high-performing employees within the organization. The Management Focus series will be written by members of the Association of Dermatology Administration/Managers (ADA/M). For more information about ADA/M, visit www.ada-m.org.

Matheny suggests health care organizations invest in leadership by creating a Leadership Development Institute (LDI). According to Matheny, the LDI will offer appropriate training to identify high, middle and low performers within the organization and ways to improve the quality of employees. Matheny also recommends leaders become involved in professional medical societies to help develop management skills to attract and retain high-quality employees, who in turn will support quality patient care.

The new “Management Focus” column will explore issues health care managers face related to patient care as well as nonclinical topics and will emphasize the benefits of collaboration in providing patient care. “In a collaborative environment everyone wins: the patient, the physician, and both the clinical and nonclinical personnel,” says Marcia Hill, MSN, RN, editor of Dermatology Nursing. “It is my hope that this column will be beneficial to all DNA members and journal readers.” (Evaluating the Performance of Health Care Employees; Pamela Matheny; Dermatology Nursing; August 2005; www.dermatologynursing.net)

Nurses Need Greater Knowledge of Psychosocial Impact of Rosacea
Rosacea is a chronic, progressive dermatologic condition that typically manifests on the face, cheeks and neck. When a patient’s face is altered by rosacea, he/she may develop body image issues as well as feel embarrassed, frustrated, anxious or depressed. In the August 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Karol Burkhart Lindow, MSN, RN, C, CNS, and co-authors examine the human dimensions of rosacea to determine if the condition affects one’s self-concept.

The authors report no significant alterations in self-concept, but do acknowledge a logical pattern of self-concept based on severity of the condition. According to Lindow and co-authors, as the condition becomes more severe, patients’ self-concept rating decreases in such areas as moral, family, social and work. The authors note the small sample size and cannot generalize their results but suggest further study of changes in self-concept to determine statistical conclusions.

In addition, Lindow and co-authors suggest nurses take a more active role in educating patients with rosacea and promote a more holistic approach to treatment. Most of the study participants received care instructions from a physician, not a nurse. A nurse’s assessment of the condition and also the patient’s feelings about his/her rosacea could identify psychosocial effects early on, say the authors. (Perceptions of Self in Persons With Rosacea; Karol Burkhart, Lindow, MSN, RN, C, CNS; Deb Shelestak, MSN, RN; Joan Lappin, MSN, RN; Dermatology Nursing; August 2005; www.dermatologynursing.net)

New Treatment for Psoriasis Requires Dermatology Nurses to Lead Patient Education Efforts
Patients suffering from limited psoriasis are typically treated with topical medications. However, approximately 25% of patients suffering from psoriasis may develop moderate or severe disease at some point in time, according to the National Psoriasis Foundation, and these patients require more than topical treatments. In the August 2005 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Daniel J. Pearce, MD, and co-authors discuss injectable medications called biologics, a new psoriasis treatment that specifically targets the immune mechanisms that cause psoriasis, as well as address common concerns of patients undergoing biologic therapy.

After beginning treatment with biologics, patients may call with questions about administering their treatment, how quickly results will appear, known risks and side effects and out-of-pocket and insurance costs. Dermatology nurses and others on the front lines of care in the dermatology community must lead patient education efforts to ensure the best care for those suffering from psoriasis, say the authors.

Pearce and co-authors contend that despite a lack of long-term safety data and high cost of this treatment, biologics are altering the face of psoriasis care and have the potential to improve psoriasis patients’ quality of life. (Biologic Therapy for Psoriasis: Telephone Triage; Daniel J. Pearce, MD; Ann Boles, RN; Heather M. Greist, MS; Steven R. Feldman, MD, PhD; Dermatology Nursing; August 2005; www.dermatologynursing.net)

# # #

Members of the media: Feel free to use these news briefs as filler in your publications. For more information, or if you would like to interview one of the authors, contact Linda Alexander at linda@ajj.com or 856-256-2300, ext. 2411.

Dermatology Nursing is the official journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA). The journal is nursing's premier skin care resource and contains state-of-the-art, peer-reviewed articles on all aspects of skin and wound care.

Back to Top



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 12, 2005
Contact: Linda Alexander
856-256-2411, ext. 2411; linda@ajj.com

Dermatology Nurses' Association Distributes Nurse Competence in Aging Awards

Pitman, NJ – The Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) presented the Nurse Competence in Aging Award to Sue McCann, MSN, RN, DNC, and Jeanne McElhose, RN, at its 23rd Annual Convention in New Orleans, February 17-20, 2005. The award recognizes an active DNA member whose professional practice and achievements best exemplify the collaborative goals and objectives of DNA and the Nurse Competence in Aging Initiative, and who is committed to nursing care for older adults. McCann and McElhose received a $400 project grant provided by the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Care.

McCann, who lives in Pittsburgh, PA, has been a member of DNA for 17 years. She is a DNA past president and previously served on the association’s Board of Directors. McCann received a bachelor’s of science in nursing from Pennsylvania State University in State College, PA, and a master’s of science in nursing from Dusquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. She is a clinical nurse in dermatology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center-Presbyterian, in Pittsburgh, PA.

McElhose, who lives in Oakmont, PA, has been a member of DNA for one year. She received a nursing degree from Presbyterian-University Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA. McElhose is a clinical nurse in dermatology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center-Presbyterian.

McCann and McElhose will use the grant to explore the effects of chronic diarrhea on the elderly population and to implement a skin care program for hospitalized patients with this problem. They plan to report their findings with a poster presentation, an article in Dermatology Nursing, DNA’s official journal, and/or a presentation at DNA’s 2006 annual convention.

The Nurse Competence in Aging Award is part of a $13,000 grant DNA received in 2004 from the American Nurses Association (ANA). The funds will be used over two years to enhance the education of nurses in caring for older adults. The DNA grant is part of a five year “Nurse Competence in Aging” initiative funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies (USA) Inc. awarded to ANA through the American Nurses Foundation (ANF). The initiative is part of a strategic alliance between ANA, the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), and the John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing, New York University, Steinhardt School of Education, Division of Nursing.

The program aims to improve the quality of health care provided to older adults by enhancing the attitudes, skills, and knowledge of over 400,000 nurses who are members of 60 national specialty associations through educational activities, certification exams, and Web-based resource centers.

For more information about DNA, visit the Web site at www.dnanurse.org; call 800-454-4DNA or 856-256-2300; fax 856-589-7463; or e-mail dna@ajj.com.

# # #

The Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNA’s core purpose is to promote excellence in dermatologic care.

Back to Top



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 1, 2005
Contact: Janet D' Alesandro
856-256-2422; janetd@ajj.com

Dermatology Nurses' Association Supports Urgent Call by World Health Organization to Restrict Use of Tanning Beds

PITMAN, NJ – The Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) announced today its strong support of the recent World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendation to ban sun bed use worldwide for those under age 18.

Citing spiking statistics in the global rate of skin cancer, the WHO released an announcement March 17, 2005 calling for countries to “formulate and reinforce laws in order to better control the use of sun beds.” Some tanning beds have the capacity to emit levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) many times more potent than the mid-day summer sun in most countries, according to the statement, and recent studies have demonstrated the direct link between the use of the tanning beds and rising skin cancer rates.

“The statistics are extremely frightening and unfortunately, these are the cases dermatology nurses are seeing every day,” said DNA President, Cathy Boeck, RN, CCRC, DNC. “The tanning trends are fueling tremendous damage and suffering, making it even more important for organizations like the WHO to shift into high gear and press for immediate action.”

While the WHO statement calls for restricted sun bed use for minors, DNA supports even more stringent limitations. According to DNA’s official position statement on indoor tanning (www.dnanurse.org, “Resources”), the association’s recommendations include:

• A sweeping FDA ban of all non-medical uses for artificial UVR, including the cosmetic use of indoor tanning beds.
• Prohibiting use of tanning beds by minors under age 18.
• Extensive public health education on the known carcinogenic effects and other associated health risks of artificial UVR and indoor tanning.
• Prohibiting public messages or advertisements promoting the “safety” of indoor tanning.

As far as legislation is concerned, DNA also supports measures to restrict minors’ use of tanning beds, Boeck said. In the United States, 22 states currently have laws in place that restrict use of tanning salons by those under 18, with similar legislation pending in several other states.

Worldwide, there are approximately 132,000 cases of malignant melanoma (the most dangerous skin cancer) annually, according to the WHO, and an estimated 66,000 deaths from that disease and other skin cancers. In the last 45 years, the skin cancer rate has tripled in some countries; in the United States, it has doubled since the 1970s. The highest rates are found in countries where people are fair skinned and have embraced the tanning culture: Australia, New Zealand, North America, and northern Europe. The WHO also states that one in three cancers worldwide is skin-related, and in the United States, that figure is one in two. In America, there are an estimated 1.1 million annual cases of skin cancer.

Members of the media: For more information about DNA, visit www.dnanurse.org. If you would like to interview DNA President Cathy Boeck, contact Janet D’Alesandro at 856-256-2422; janetd@ajj.com.

# # #

The Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise.
DNA’s core purpose is to promote excellence in dermatologic care.

Did you know . . . May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month?

Back to Top



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 30, 2005
Contact: Linda Alexander
856-256-2300, ext. 2411, linda@ajj.com

Cathy Boeck Assumes Presidency of Dermatology Nurses' Association

PITMAN, NJ – Cathy Boeck, RN, CCRC, DNC, assistant director of clinical research in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, assumed the role of president of the Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) for 2005-06 during DNA’s 23rd Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA, February 17-20, 2005.

As president, Ms. Boeck will lead the strategic direction of DNA; promote the philosophy, purpose, and objectives of the association; and serve as representative and spokesperson. In addition, Ms. Boeck will contribute to FOCUS, DNA’s quarterly newsletter, and Dermatology Nursing journal, DNA’s official journal.

Ms. Boeck has been a DNA member for 18 years, and previously served on the board of directors. She received her associate’s degree in nursing from Anoka-Ramsey Community College and a bachelor’s degree from Metropolitan State University. Ms. Boeck became a certified clinical research coordinator in 1997 and received her dermatology nurse certification in 1998. She is a member of the Association of Clinical Research Professionals and the Hair Research Society.

For more information about DNA, visit the association’s Web site, www.dnanurse.org, or contact the national office at East Holly Avenue, Box 56, Pitman, NJ 08071; phone: 800-454-4DNA or 856-256-2330; e-mail: dna@ajj.com.

###

The Dermatology Nurses' Association is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNAs mission is to develop and promote education and nursing leadership in dermatologic care.

Back to Top


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 17, 2005
Contact: Linda Alexander
(856) 256-2300 ext. 2411, linda@ajj.com

Dermatology Nurses' Association Shows What They Know Matters with Record-Breaking Attendance at Annual Convention

PITMAN, NJ – The Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) drew over 1,000 nurses to its 23rd Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA, February 17-20, marking the highest convention attendance in its history.

Armed with the theme Because What We Know Matters, attendees enjoyed an exhibit hall filled with 107 booths, as well as a wide variety of special events, networking opportunities, and top-quality educational sessions. The sessions, taught by nationally known dermatologic experts, included such topics as new treatments for acne and rosacea; MOHS Surgery and treatment of skin cancer; ethnic differences in skin conditions; digital photography in dermatologic procedure; lasers in dermatologic settings; and ethical issues in dermatology.

“This year’s convention was a tremendous success. We reached a record number of nurses with our program and equipped them with the knowledge and expertise needed to meet their patients’ needs,” said DNA’s new President, Cathy Boeck, RN, CCRC, DNC. Ms. Boeck was inducted into office, along with the other DNA officers for 2005-06, at the meeting.

In keeping with the convention theme, keynote speaker Connie Merritt, BSN, RN, PHN, helped nurses broaden their knowledge and opened the conference by exploring the values and teachings of Marcus Welby, a character from Marcus Welby, MD, one of the most popular medical television shows in America’s history. Ms. Merritt showed participants how to be a modern-day Marcus Welby by delivering quality care in a brave new world.

DNA also hosted several pre-convention workshops, including the new Nurse Practitioner Forum, which featured a speaker panel of academic leaders and experts – a “who’s who” in dermatology. The panel led an in-depth discussion on dermatopathology, cutaneous signs of serious illness, coding in dermatology, and more. Other pre-convention workshops included a Dermatology Nursing Basics Course, a Dermatologic Surgery Core Curriculum Course, a Wound Care Workshop, and the Joan Shelk Memorial Phototherapy Workshop, which is a special tribute to DNA Past President Joan Shelk.

For more information about DNA, visit the Web site at www.dnanurse.org; call 800-454-4DNA or 856-256-2330; fax 856-589-7463; or email dna@ajj.com.

# # #

The Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNA’s mission is to develop and promote education and nursing leadership in dermatologic care.

Back to Top



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 11, 2005
Contact: Linda Alexander
(856) 256-2300 ext. 2411, linda@ajj.com

Dermatology Nursing Journal Presents Writer’s Awards at DNA Convention
Charles Crutchfield, III, MD, Honored with First Editor’s Award

PITMAN, NJ – Dermatology Nursing journal continued its tradition of recognizing nurse authors for outstanding contributions to the journal during the Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA) 23rd Annual Convention, February 17-20, 2005, in New Orleans.

The Dermatology Nursing Editorial Board created the Editor’s Award to recognize an individual who has made special contributions to the journal and to dermatology nursing education. Dermatology Nursing editor Marcia J. Hill, MSN, RN, presented the first Editor’s Award to Charles Crutchfield, III, MD, who was recognized for his devotion to teaching and learning and for his efforts in enriching the lives of the nurses and patients in his practice. Dr. Crutchfield, of Crutchfield Dermatology in Eagan, MN, encourages his entire nursing staff to submit articles to Dermatology Nursing. To date, the journal has published nine clinical snapshots from Dr. Crutchfield’s staff, and two others await publication. Dr. Crutchfield funds membership fees to DNA, as well as registration, lodging, and transportation for DNA’s Annual Convention, for the staff.

Margaret M. Reavely, AAS, RN, CNII, and Lynn D. Wilson, MD, MPH, received the 2004 Dermatology Nursing Writer’s Award – Category One, for previously unpublished authors. Their article “Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy and Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: A Clinical Guide for Patients and Staff,” was published in the February 2004 issue of the journal. Reavely is a radiation oncology clinical nurse and Wilson is an associate professor in the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine and Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT.

Lenore M. Lamanna, EdD, RN, received the 2004 Dermatology Nursing Writer’s Award – Category Two, for previously published authors. Lamanna’s article “College Students’ Knowledge and Attitudes about Cancer and Perceived Risks of Developing Skin Cancer,” was published in the April 2004 issue of the journal. Lamanna is a clinical professor of nursing, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY.

To receive guidelines for the 2005 Writer’s Awards, contact Lori Ann Tornatore, Editorial Coordinator, Dermatology Nursing at 856-256-2300, ext. 2344, or tornatol@ajj.com.

Dermatology Nursing is the official journal of the DNA. For more information about the association, visit www.dnanurse.org.

# # #

Dermatology Nursing is the official journal of the Dermatology Nurses’ Association (DNA). The journal is nursing’s premier skin care resource and contains state-of-the-art, peer-reviewed articles on all aspects of skin and wound care.

Back to Top