The Dermatology Nurses' Association
Nurses serving nurses for more than 30 years!

Press Releases

2004

Please note that due to a change in management companies in 2008, the contact information found in all press releases prior to January 1, 2008 is no longer applicable.

Dermatology Nurses' Association Announces National Election Results Released: December 9, 2004
The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) recently elected new members to its Board of Directors for the 2005-06 term. The officers will assume their respective positions at DNA's 23rd Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA, February 17-20, 2005.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs Released: December 8, 2004
Lentigo maligna (LM) melanoma is a melanoma in situ on sun-damaged skin, which means it is a superficial form of melanoma localized within the epidermis, without invasion into the dermis or second layer of the skin. Its growth is generally slow, but it can become an invasive form of melanoma, so early detection and treatment is important.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nurses' Association Launches Career Center Released: December 2, 2004
In an effort to help match qualified dermatology nurses with employers, the Dermatology Nurses' Association has launched an on-line Career Center on its Web site, www.dnanurse.org. The DNA Career Center is a participating member of the HEALTHeCAREERS Network, an on-line pool of over 50 health care association career centers.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nurses to Increase Scope of Knowledge at Annual Convention Released: December 1, 2004
The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) will hold its 23rd Annual Convention on February 17-20, 2005, at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans, New Orleans, LA. The ever-changing field of dermatology requires nurses to constantly broaden their knowledge base.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs Released: November 3, 2004
Health care professionals strive to understand what patients go through with their dermatologic diseases, but they may not ask the patient, "What is it like living with this condition?" Dermatology Nursing journal addresses this question with its new series, "Patients' Perspectives: Living With..."
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nurses' Association Awarded Nurse Competence Grant for Geriatric Care Released: May 5, 2004
The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) has been awarded a $13,000 Nurse Competence in Aging Grant by the American Nurses Association (ANA). The funds will be used over 2 years to enhance the education of nurses in caring for older adults.
Read the Full Release

New CD-ROM Helps Providers Recognize and Manage Common Skin Conditions Released: May 3, 2004
The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) has seen a high demand for its new CD-ROM, "Dermatology: Recognition and Management of Common Conditions." The CD-ROM is a comprehensive, interactive, education program that focuses on the care of pediatric, adult, and geriatric patients with common skin disorders.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nursing Journal Honors Writers At Annual Convention Released: March 12, 2004
Dermatology Nursing journal recognized several nurse authors for outstanding contributions to the journal during the Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) 22nd Annual Convention, March 4-8 in Orlando, FL.
Read the Full Release

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs Released: February 5, 2004
A Dermatology Nursing journal article, "Assessing Pain in Older Adults," was named as one of the top 10 most read articles on the "Medscape Nurses Greatest Hits of 2003." Published in the June 2003 issue of the journal, it is part of a regular series provided by The Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing. The "Try This" Series provides easy-to-use tools that can be implemented quickly into clinical practices.
Read the Full Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 9, 2004
Contact: Elise Denmon
(856) 256-2300 ext. 2411, denmone@ajj.com

Dermatology Nurses' Association Announces National Election Results

PITMAN, NJ - The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) recently elected new members to its Board of Directors for the 2005-06 term. The officers will assume their respective positions at DNA's 23rd Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA, February 17-20, 2005.

Melodie Young, MSN, RN, A/GNP, has been chosen as DNA's national president-elect. Ms. Young is a nurse practitioner at Texas Dermatology Associates, Dallas, TX, and an adjunct clinical instructor at the University of Texas Graduate School of Nursing, Arlington, TX. As president-elect, Ms. Young will work with incoming president Cathleen Boeck, RN, CCRC, DNC, to lead the strategic direction of DNA.

Laura Musse, MS, RN, has been elected as a director. Ms. Musse is a clinical research nurse specialist, Experimental Transplant Immunology Branch, at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. Karen M. Fairbrother, BSN, RN, DNC, has been re-elected as a director. Ms. Fairbrother is a registered nurse, a clinical wellness specialist, and a nurse educator at St. Peter's Hospital, Helena, MT. She is also a registered nurse at Associated Dermatology, Helena, MT.

The directors serve 2-year terms as the official spokespersons for DNA and assume responsibilities delegated by the president. They also serve as a resource and liaison to task forces and guide them in establishing their goals.

The new 2005-06 DNA Board of Directors is as follows:

President - Cathleen Boeck, RN, CCRC, DNC
President-Elect - Melodie Young, MSN, RN, A/GNP
Secretary/Treasurer - Leslie Plauntz, RN, DNC
Director - Laura Musse, MS, RN
Director - Karen M. Fairbrother, BSN, RN, DNC
Director - Barbara Sinni McKeehen, MSN, ARNP, DNC
Director - Susan Tofte, MS, RN, FNP-C
Immediate Past President - Robin Weber, MN, RN, FNP-C, DNC

Two new members were elected to the DNA Nominating Committee: Susan Booher, MS, RN, a research nurse specialist, Dermatology Branch, at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; and Maryann Forgach, BSN, RN, a charge nurse, Center for Dermatologic and Cosmetic Surgery, at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

The nominating committee coordinates the review of candidates' credentials and willingness to serve, and provides a final slate of officers to the Board of Directors each year. Members serve for 2 years.

The 2005-06 DNA Nominating Committee members are:

Susan Booher, MS, RN
Maryann Forgach, BSN, RN
Becky Gladis, LPN
Bonita Weyrauch, RN, CWS, CCT

For more information about DNA, visit www.dnanurse.org or contact DNA, East Holly Avenue Box 56, Pitman, NJ 08071-0056; phone (800) 454-4DNA or (856) 256-2330; fax (856) 589-7463; e-mail dna@ajj.com.

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The Dermatology Nurses' Association is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNAs mission is to develop and promote education and nursing leadership in dermatologic care.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 8, 2004
Contact: Elise Denmon
(856) 256-2300 ext. 2411, elise@ajj.com

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs

Best Treatment Options for Lentigo Maligna
Lentigo maligna (LM) melanoma is a melanoma in situ on sun-damaged skin, which means it is a superficial form of melanoma localized within the epidermis, without invasion into the dermis or second layer of the skin. Its growth is generally slow, but it can become an invasive form of melanoma, so early detection and treatment is important. In the December 2004 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Leslie J. Christenson, MD, evaluates several treatment options for LM.

Dr. Christenson recommends excision by the wide-margin Mohs technique (taking at least the 5 mm recommended margin around the tumor), with confirmation of the absolute peripheral rim from permanent pathologic slides read by a dermatopathologist. Radiation therapy is also an option, especially in patients who can not tolerate surgery.

The author suggests preparing patients mentally for the possible extensiveness of their therapy. He also recommends that once patients have been diagnosed with LM, prevention of another melanoma is important. (Leslie J. Christenson, MD; Management of Lentigo Maligna; December 2004; Dermatology Nursing; www.dermatologynursing.net)

Study Evaluates Best Mattresses and Positions to Avoid Pressure Ulcers
Pressure ulcers are a major health care problem in terms of mobility, suffering, and the associated economic impact. In the December 2004 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Parivash Moody, BSN, RN, and co-authors examine the interface pressure from different types of mattresses and positions, to determine the best option for quadriplegic patients.

The authors examined the range of pressure on the body of a quadriplegic patient using two types of mattresses: pressure relieving and pressure reducing. They also studied the amount of pressure on the body in four different positions including three supine positions, with the head of the bed elevated at 45°, 60°, and 65°; and one lateral position with the head elevated at 30°.

The results of the study indicated that the 30° lateral position caused less pressure compared with the other three positions on both mattresses. The higher degree body positions rendered higher interface pressure, therefore the authors recommend the 60° and 65° positions should be avoided as much as possible.

All bedridden patients should be considered at risk of pressure ulcer development, according to the authors. They also suggest that a nursing care plan be formulated and implemented based on the patient's medical condition and duration of immobilization. (Parivash Moody, BSN, RN, Irene Gonzales, PhD, RN, CNP, Virginia Young Cureton, DrPH, RN; The Effect of Body Position and Mattress Type on Interface Pressure in Quadriplegic Adults: A Pilot Study; December 2004; Dermatology Nursing; www.dermatologynursing.net).

Treatments for Excessive Sweating
Hyperhidrosis is associated with significant psychosocial morbidity and has a dramatic impact on quality of life. It is a disease of the eccrine sweat glands that causes excessive sweating. In the December 2004 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Aamir Haider, MD, PharmD, and Nowell Solish, MD, FRCP, outline the current approaches to diagnosis and management of this disease.

Treatments can be classified into topical, oral, surgical, and nonsurgical. Of the different options available, the nonsurgical treatment, botulinum toxin, has a reported efficacy of greater than 90%. It causes the least side effects and is well-tolerated. However, the cost of the drug and need for repeated treatments may be a limitation.

According to the authors, health care professionals must be aware of the risks, benefits, and reasonable expectations of the available treatment modalities. They also suggest that with proper screening, education, and therapeutic intervention, the patients' quality of life can be enhanced. (Aamir Haider, MD, PharmD, Nowell Solish, MD, FRCP; Hyperhidrosis: An Approach to Diagnosis and Management; December 2004; Dermatology Nursing; www.dermatologynursing.net)

Dermatology Nurses to Increase Scope of Knowledge at Conference
The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) will hold its 23rd Annual Convention on February 17-20, 2005, at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans, New Orleans, LA.

The ever-changing field of dermatology requires nurses to constantly broaden their knowledge base. Program planners have met this challenge by including a wide variety of education sessions on dermatologic and professional topics at all levels, from basic to advanced.

In addition to education sessions, participants will network with colleagues, attend special events, earn continuing education credits, and learn about the latest products and technologies in the exhibit hall. The complete registration brochure is available on DNA's Web site, www.dnanurse.org.

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The Dermatology Nurses' Association is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNAs mission is to develop and promote education and nursing leadership in dermatologic care.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 2, 2004
Contact: Elise Denmon
(856) 256-2300 ext. 2411, denmone@ajj.com

Dermatology Nurses' Association Launches Career Center

PITMAN, NJ - In an effort to help match qualified dermatology nurses with employers, the Dermatology Nurses' Association has launched an on-line Career Center on its Web site, www.dnanurse.org.

The DNA Career Center is a participating member of the HEALTHeCAREERS Network, an on-line pool of over 50 health care association career centers. DNA's Career Center is designed to help nurses who are looking for a job as well as employers who need to fill positions.

"In this era of specialized health care, everyone wins when dermatologists have ready access to experienced nurses and support staff," said DNA president Robin Weber, MN, RN, FNP-C, DNC. "The DNA Career Center allows those looking for qualified staff to have widespread access to those most qualified."

Job seekers can search and reply to job openings, post resumés confidentially or openly, send a cover letter when responding to a posting, sign up for new job notifications, and receive personal assistance.

Using DNA's on-line option, recruiters can target the top tier of qualified dermatology nurses through the 3,000 members of DNA and more than 2 million HEALTHeCAREERS network association members. They can post jobs, access the resumé databank, get notifications of new resumés, and receive personal consultation throughout the contract term.

In addition, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) is participating in the network. This allows AAD members to post job openings and recruit top dermatology nurses to their practices.

Employers can post positions immediately to the DNA Career Center by contacting the HEALTHeCAREERS Customer Care Department at 888-884-8242. Advertisements for dermatology nursing positions start at $195 per month. To search for a job or post a resumé, visit www.dnanurse.org and click on "Jobs" and "For Candidates."

For more information about DNA, visit www.dnanurse.org or contact DNA, East Holly Avenue Box 56, Pitman, NJ 08071-0056; phone (800) 454-4DNA or (856) 256-2330; fax (856) 589-7463; e-mail dna@ajj.com.

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The Dermatology Nurses' Association is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNAs mission is to develop and promote education and nursing leadership in dermatologic care.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 1, 2004
Contact: Elise Denmon
(856) 256-2300 ext. 2411, denmone@ajj.com

Dermatology Nurses to Increase Scope of Knowledge at Annual Convention

Dermatology Nurses' Association 23rd Annual Convention
Because What We Know Matters
February 17-20, 2005 - New Orleans, Louisiana

www.dnanurse.org

PITMAN, NJ - The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) will hold its 23rd Annual Convention on February 17-20, 2005, at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans, New Orleans, LA.

The ever-changing field of dermatology requires nurses to constantly broaden their knowledge base. Program planners have met this challenge by including a wide variety of education sessions on dermatologic and professional topics at all levels, from basic to advanced.

In addition to education sessions, participants will network with colleagues, attend special events, earn continuing education credits, and learn about the latest products and technologies in the exhibit hall. The complete registration brochure is available on DNA's Web site, www.dnanurse.org.

Program
On Thursday, February 17, five pre-convention education activities will be offered including the Nurse Practitioner Forum, a speaker panel of "who's who" in dermatology. Academic leaders and experts will provide a discussion on pearls for dermatopathology, cutaneous signs of serious illness, coding in dermatology, and more. Other pre-convention workshops include a Dermatology Nursing Basics Course, a Dermatologic Surgery Core Curriculum Course, a Joan Shelk Memorial Phototherapy Workshop, and a Wound Care Workshop.

On Friday, February 18, keynote speaker Connie Merritt, BSN, RN, PHN, will open the conference by exploring the values and teachings of Marcus Welby, a character from "Marcus Welby, MD," one of the most popular medical television shows in America's history. Ms. Merrit will show participants how to be a modern Marcus Welby, delivering quality care in a brave new world.

Concurrent sessions will be held Friday, February 18, to Sunday, February 20. Topics include:

New treatments and research for acne and rosacea
Ethical issues in dermatology
Ethnic differences in skin diseases
Digital photography in the dermatologic procedure
Lasers in dermatologic settings
Tips and techniques for biopsies and suturing
MOHS Surgery and treatment of skin cancer
Hair loss disorders
Pediatric skin conditions

During the session, How to Write for Publication, Marcia J. Hill, MSN, RN, editor of Dermatology Nursing journal, will explain the publication process. This session is open to new writers interested in submitting manuscripts to a peer-reviewed professional journal.

Certification Exam
The Dermatology Nurse Certification Exam will be offered on Saturday, February 19. Pre-registration is required for the exam. For more information, contact C-NET at 800-463-0786.

Continuing Education
The 3-day convention will provide a minimum of 15.2 contact hours. Additional contact hours will be given for the special education activities and pre-conference sessions.

Special Events
In addition to education sessions, there will be several corporate-sponsored breakfast, lunch, and dinner symposia. Topics include biologic therapy for psoriasis; anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor) therapy in the treatment of psoriatic disease; innovations in acne therapy; and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors in dermatology.

On Thursday, February 17, DNA will hold its annual opening reception. Attendees will enjoy music, hors d'oeuvres, and beverages. The reception is sponsored by an unrestricted education grant from Fujisawa Healthcare, Inc.

Registration
Complete conference information and on-line registration are available on DNA's Web site, www.dnanurse.org. For additional information, contact the DNA National Office, East Holly Avenue Box 56, Pitman, NJ 08071-0056; phone (800) 454-4DNA or (856) 256-2330; fax (856) 589-7463; e-mail dna@ajj.com.

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The Dermatology Nurses' Association is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNAs mission is to develop and promote education and nursing leadership in dermatologic care.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 3, 2004
Contact: Elise Denmon
elise@ajj.com, 856-256-2300 ext. 2411

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs

New Column Shows Patient's Perspective
Health care professionals strive to understand what patients go through with their dermatologic diseases, but they may not ask the patient, "What is it like living with this condition?" Dermatology Nursing journal addresses this question with its new series, "Patients' Perspectives: Living With..."

Debuting in the October issue of the journal, the series offers a patient's perspective on living with a specific skin disease. It gives insight into how the disease affects the patient's life and relationships with others. Patients submit answers to questions such as:

How has your condition affected your life, physically and emotionally?
What would you like health care providers to know about treating people with your condition?
What do you wish society knew about your condition?
What would you tell other people who are newly diagnosed with this condition?

"With all the studies looking at quality of life issues for patients with skin disease, maybe it's time we heard the patient's perspective," said Marcia J. Hill, MSN, RN, Editor. "I believe these valuable insights will provide important information to help dermatology nurses better care for their patients."

Patients interested in sharing their experiences with the dermatology nursing community can contact Lori Ann Tornatore, Editorial Assistant, at tornatol@ajj.com for a complete list of questions and submission details.

Patient Shares Feelings About Living with Hidradenitis Suppurative
Dermatology nurses and other health care professionals may sometimes fail to appreciate and recognize the physical and emotional challenges faced by patients with a particular chronic dermatologic disease or condition. In the October issue of Dermatology Nursing, Shari Tosk Solarski shows readers how hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) has affected her life in the journal's new series "Patients' Perspectives: Living With..."

HS is characterized by recurrent boils or cysts on various parts of the body. At times, the disease has totally immobilized Solarski, making her unable to function and perform even the simplest tasks. She said that HS been devastating, making her at times totally dependent on others, and that she would like to see more dermatologists recognize the symptoms and diagnose the disease correctly.

Solarski found support in the organization, HS-USA, Inc. (www.hs-usa.org), and connected with fellow sufferers. She is a New Jersey contact person for the organization, and leads the New Jersey Hidradenitis Support Group.

This personal testimony stresses that it is important for dermatology nurses and other health care providers to recognize the emotional challenges that patients face, and strive to understand the disease from a patient's perspective. (Shari Tosk Solarksi, MA, BS, Living With Hidradenitis Suppurativa, October 2004, Dermatology Nursing, www.dermatologynursing.net)

Treatment Options for Hyperpigmentation Disorders
The visible nature of hyperpigmentation disorders has a considerable psychological effect on patients. Many therapeutic options exist, but treatment is often difficult and requires lengthy therapy. In the October 2003 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Kimberly A. Cayce, MD, and co-authors describe common hyperpigmentation disorders and recommend treatment options for each.

The many therapeutic options call for well-organized, low-risk treatment regimens including topical depigmenting agents, chemical peels, cryosurgery, dermabrasion, and pigment-specific lasers. It is extremely important in all cases that patients use sunscreen and minimize ultraviolet exposure.

Patient education is essential for successful treatment, according to the authors. They also recommend educating patients that in most hyperpigmentation cases, treatment may take an extended period of time. (Kimberly A. Cayce, MD, Amy McMichael, MD, Steven R. Feldman, PhD, MD, Hyperpigmentation: An Overview of the Common Afflictions, October 2004, Dermatology Nursing, www.dermatologynursing.net)

Study Compares Costs of Psoriasis Therapies
Psoriasis can be a devastating disease and affects individuals not only physically and psychosocially, but financially. In the October 2004 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Daniel J. Pearce, MD, and co-authors compare the cost and complexity of different psoriasis treatment regimens.

The authors found that medication prices vary considerably, from relatively inexpensive topical corticosteroids to more costly biologic therapies. Prices range from $78.60 a month for corticosteroids to $1,300 a month for biologic therapies.

Many considerations must go into selecting the right therapy, according to the authors, and a comprehensive approach that weighs the cost to the patient will optimize care. (Daniel J. Pearce, MD, Crystal G. Thomas, Alan B. Fleischer, Jr., MD, Steven R. Feldman, PhD, MD, The Cost of Psoriasis Therapies: Considerations for Therapy Selection, October 2004, Dermatology Nursing, www.dermatologynursing.net)

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Dermatology Nursing is the official journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA). The journal is nursing's premier skin care resource and contains state-of-the-art, peer-reviewed articles on all aspects of skin and wound care.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 5, 2004
Contact: Janet D'Alesandro
janetd@ajj.com, (856) 256-2422

Dermatology Nurses' Association Awarded Nurse Competence Grant for Geriatric Care

PITMAN, NJ - The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) has been awarded a $13,000 Nurse Competence in Aging Grant by the American Nurses Association (ANA). The funds will be used over 2 years to enhance the education of nurses in caring for older adults.

The grant is part of a 5-year "Nurse Competence in Aging" initiative funded by The Atlantic Philanthropies (USA) Inc. awarded to ANA through the American Nurses Foundation (ANF). The initiative is part of a strategic alliance between ANA, the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), and the John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing, New York University, Steinhardt School of Education, Division of Nursing.

The program will enhance the geriatric competence - the attitudes, knowledge, and skills - of the 400,000 nurses who are members of 60 national specialty nursing associations. Education will be disseminated through activities, certification exams, and Web-based resource centers.

"We are honored to have been given this important grant and know that it will not only enrich our members but most significantly our patients for many years to come," said DNA President Robin Weber, MN, RN, FNP-C, DNC. "It is anticipated that we will use these funds to develop a new depth in our education programs and patient education materials."

DNA will also use the grant funds for articles in DNA's official journal, Dermatology Nursing, and in the association's newsletter, FOCUS; for Web site links; and for sessions at the DNA Annual Convention.

Geriatric care is one of the fastest growing segments of nursing, but very few of the nation's 2.2 million practicing registered nurses (RNs) have been adequately prepared in school or on the job. Less than 1% of nurses in the U.S. are certified by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) as gerontological nurses. One goal of the Nurse Competence program is to inspire nurses to boost their knowledge of geriatrics best practices.

DNA will submit ongoing progress reports and participate in an evaluation of the competence program. This documentation will help ANA determine the lasting impact of the funding on geriatric nursing.

For more details on the competence program, visit www.hartfordign.org/nca/index.html. For more information about DNA, visit www.dnanurse.org.

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The Dermatology Nurses' Association is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNAs mission is to develop and promote education and nursing leadership in dermatologic care.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 3, 2004
Contact: Elise Denmon
elise@ajj.com; (856) 256-2300 x. 2411

New CD-ROM Helps Providers Recognize and Manage Common Skin Conditions
Interactive learning program offered by the Dermatology Nurses' Association instantly popular with health care providers seeking a visual education tool.

PITMAN, NJ - The Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) has seen a high demand for its new CD-ROM, "Dermatology: Recognition and Management of Common Conditions." The CD-ROM is a comprehensive, interactive, education program that focuses on the care of pediatric, adult, and geriatric patients with common skin disorders.

Developed by two DNA leaders, Barb Bielan, BSN, RN, NPC, and Sherrill Jantzi Rudy, MSN, RN, CPNP, the CD-ROM features 31 animated lectures, over 400 clinical slides, a hyper-linked glossary, and an extensive help book. It also offers 20 continuing education credits.

The CD-ROM is an excellent teaching tool and resource for caregivers new to dermatology, practitioners who are studying for the dermatology nursing certification exam, or anyone seeking to hone their diagnostic skills. It is also an ideal tool for nurse practitioners and physician assistants who care for patients with skin conditions but whose practice is not specific to dermatology.

The CD-ROM examines such topics as:

Structure and function of the skin
Initial assessment and skin exam techniques
Pathogenesis, assessment, and management of acne
Superficial bacterial infections, herpes viruses, and other infestations
Papulosquamous diseases including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis
Melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, and other skin cancers
Geriatric skin conditions and the effects of aging on the skin
Topical and systemic therapies

"With so many people requesting a program like this, we knew we had to offer something that pictured and explained various pathologies," said DNA Education Director, Sally Russell, MN, CMSRN. "Feedback has been tremendous, with users telling us that the CD-ROM has helped them understand diagnostic studies as well as medical and nursing treatments."

The cost of the CD-ROM is $149 for DNA members and $189 for nonmembers. A Web subscription is available for $128 for members, $169 for nonmembers. For more information, visit DNA's Web site, www.dnanurse.org or contact DNA, East Holly Avenue Box 56, Pitman, NJ 08071-0056; phone (800) 454-4DNA or (856) 256-2330; fax (856) 589-7463; e-mail dna@ajj.com.

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The Dermatology Nurses' Association is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNAs mission is to develop and promote education and nursing leadership in dermatologic care.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 12, 2004
Contact: Elise Denmon
(856) 256-2300 ext. 2411, elise@ajj.com

Dermatology Nursing Journal Honors Writers At Annual Convention

PITMAN, NJ - Dermatology Nursing journal recognized several nurse authors for outstanding contributions to the journal during the Dermatology Nurses' Association (DNA) 22nd Annual Convention, March 4-8 in Orlando, FL.

Zach N. Anderson, LPN; Scott M. Podnos, MD; and Risha Shirley-King, PA-C, received the 2003 Dermatology Nursing Writer's Award - Category One, for previously unpublished authors. Their article, "Patient Satisfaction During the Administration of Local Anesthesia Using a Computer Controlled Local Anesthetic Delivery System," was published in the August 2003 issue of the journal. Mr. Anderson is the Director, Compliance and Clinical Relations, Medical Hair Restoration, Orlando, FL. He also conducts clinical research activities for Advanced Dermatology and Advanced Cosmetic Surgery. Dr. Podnos is a Board Certified Dermatologist, and Ms. Shirley is a Board Certified Physician Assistant, Advanced Dermatology and Advanced Cosmetic Surgery, Orlando, FL.

Gina Leone, BSN, RN; Kathy Rolston, RN, DNC, CCRC; and Gail Spaulding, BS, RN, received the 2003 Dermatology Nursing Writer's Award - Category Two, for previously published authors. Their article, "Alefacept for Chronic Plaque Psoriasis: A Selective Therapy with Long-Lasting Disease Remissions and an Encouraging Safety Profile" was published in the June 2003 issue of the journal. At the time of the study, Ms. Leone was a Clinical Program Manager - Amevive®, Biogen, Inc., Cambridge, MA. She is now the Associate Director of Clinical Affiars, Therion Biologics Corp., Cambridge, MA. Ms. Rolston is Director of Phototherapy and Clinical Research, Rivergate Dermatology and Skin Care Center, Goodlettsville, TN. Ms. Spaulding is an Amevive® Nurse Consultant, Biogen, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC.

To receive guidelines for the 2004 Writer's Awards, contact Elise Denmon, Assistant Managing Editor, Dermatology Nursing. Phone (856) 256-2300 ext. 2411; e-mail: elise@ajj.com.

Dermatology Nursing is the official journal of the DNA. For more information about the association, visit www.dnanurse.org.

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The Dermatology Nurses' Association is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNAs mission is to develop and promote education and nursing leadership in dermatologic care.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 5, 2004
Contact: Elise Denmon
(856) 256-2300 ext. 2411, elise@ajj.com

Dermatology Nursing News Briefs

Dermatology Nursing Series Article Named to Top 10 List
A Dermatology Nursing journal article, "Assessing Pain in Older Adults," was named as one of the top 10 most read articles on the "Medscape Nurses Greatest Hits of 2003." Published in the June 2003 issue of the journal, it is part of a regular series provided by The Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing. The "Try This" Series provides easy-to-use tools that can be implemented quickly into clinical practices. For more information about The Hartford Institute visit www.hartfordign.org or e-mail hartford.ign@nyu.edu. To view the article on Medscape, visit www.medscape.com/viewarticle/466122. (Try This: Assessing Pain in Older Adults, June 2003, Dermatology Nursing, www.dermatologynursing.net)

Treatments for Immunobullous Diseases
Several therapies are now available to treat immunobullous diseases, however there are few studies comparing their effectiveness. In the February 2004 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Sandrine Reynaert, MD, MSc, and Martin M. Black, MD, FRCP, FRCPath, explain each therapy and evaluate their efficacy.

The medications used to treat immunobullous disorders can be classified into rapid and slow acting, topical and systemic, or immunosuppressant/immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory. Therapies include steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis, azathioprine, cyclosporine, and more.

According to Reynaert and Black, the severity of disease and responses to potential side effects must be evaluated in each patient and tailored to meet individual needs. The authors also write that more studies comparing different treatment regimens are needed to manage the disease more effectively in the future. (Sandrine Reynaert, MD, MSc, & Martin M. Black, MD, FRCP, FRCPath, Treating Immunobullous Diseases: An Update, February 2004, Dermatology Nursing, www.dermatologynursing.net)

Electron Beam Therapy to Treat CTCL
Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a technically complicated treatment used to manage mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). In the February 2004 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Margaret M. Reavely, AAS, RN, and Lynn D. Wilson, MD, MPH, review a variety of technical and clinically oriented issues relating to TSEBT and its effects for patients.

CTCL results from the development of abnormal T-lymphocytes, and therefore is a cancer of the lymphocytes (lymphoma). TSEBT is used when there are many skin lesions covering a significant proportion of the skin surface. At the authors' institution, the treatment is given on 4 consecutive days for 9 consecutive weeks. The depth of penetration of the electron is minimal so only the skin is effectively treated. Despite the relatively intense treatment schedule, with appropriate clinical management, the therapy is very well tolerated on an outpatient basis.

According to Reavely and Wilson, TSEBT is an extremely effective management tool for treating CTCL. They also concluded that ongoing nursing evaluation and clinical support are critical for a successful treatment program. (Margaret M. Reavely, AAS, RN, & , Lynn D. Wilson, MD, MPH, Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy and Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: A Clinical Guide for Patients and Staff, February 2004, Dermatology Nursing, www.dermatologynursing.net)

More Research Needed For Treatment of Intertrigo
Intertrigo is an inflammatory dermatosis of the skin folds, for which a large variety of topical medications may be recommended. In the February 2004 issue of Dermatology Nursing, Patriek Mistiaen, MSN, RN, and co-authors performed a systematic literature review to find scientific evidence for preventing and treating intertrigo within the nursing domain.

Studies were analyzed on content and methodologic quality. Most studies concerned treatments with antifungals or disinfectants in heterogeneous research samples, with only small subsamples of people with intertrigo. The analyzed studies provided no scientific evidence for any type of nursing prevention or treatment strategy.

According to Mistiaen and co-authors, the nursing profession lacks a research basis for a basic nursing problem. They concluded that there is a great need for research on preventative measures for this disease. (Patriek Mistiaen, MSN, RN, and co-authors, Preventing and Treating Intertrigo in the Large Skin Folds of Adults: A Literature Overview, February 2004, Dermatology Nursing, www.dermatologynursing.net)

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The Dermatology Nurses' Association is a professional nursing organization comprised of a diverse group of individuals committed to quality care through sharing knowledge and expertise. DNAs mission is to develop and promote education and nursing leadership in dermatologic care.

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